© Heinz Schoon 2017
Religious Reasons for Emigration
After the Thirty Years' War, the rulers chose a religion that the inhabitants of their country also had to accept. The legal principle laid down in the Peace of Westphalia and the Peace of Augsburg states: "Cuius regio, eius religio." (Whose dominion, whose religion.) Through this rigorous form of religious determination, various opposition currents formed underground that did not want to adapt to this dictate. These included the Huguenots, Waldensians, Hussites, Mennonites, Pietists, Separatists and the Chiliasts. The emigrants to Teplitz belonged to the Chiliasts. The interventions in church life by the church leadership and the state promoted the opposition to the church and the ruler. In 1791 a new hymnal was introduced and in 1809 a new form of liturgy was introduced, which was not accepted by many believers. In private circles they preached in the old liturgy. The Chiliasts believed in the near end of the world. In this end-time mood they hoped for a future kingdom as described in the revelations of the apostle John. They believed that Christ would rise again and establish a kingdom of peace for a thousand years. (from the Greek: χιλία- chilia "thousand", further information can also be found under "Millennialism" or “Premillennialism”). They were convinced that the millennial empire would begin in 1836. The Chiliasts wanted to experience this event in Jerusalem. However, it was not possible to leave there and so all hopes were pinned on the Caucasus. One of the protagonists of this movement was Baroness Juliane von Kruedener, who was also considered a prophetess. It influenced the Chiliasts to choose Mount Ararat, the alleged site where Noah's Ark can be found, as a new departure destination. This concept was also favoured by the Russian government's colonisation plans. King Wilhelm I. of Württemberg, the son of Friedrich I., cancelled the travel ban and in 1817 the wave of emigration to the east began.
Juliane von Krüdener
© Heinz Schoon 2017
Religious Reasons for Emigration
After the Thirty Years' War, the rulers chose a religion that the inhabitants of their country also had to accept. The legal principle laid down in the Peace of Westphalia and the Peace of Augsburg states: "Cuius regio, eius religio." (Whose dominion, whose religion.) Through this rigorous form of religious determination, various opposition currents formed underground that did not want to adapt to this dictate. These included the Huguenots, Waldensians, Hussites, Mennonites, Pietists, Separatists and the Chiliasts. The emigrants to Teplitz belonged to the Chiliasts. The interventions in church life by the church leadership and the state promoted the opposition to the church and the ruler. In 1791 a new hymnal was introduced and in 1809 a new form of liturgy was introduced, which was not accepted by many believers. In private circles they preached in the old liturgy. The Chiliasts believed in the near end of the world. In this end-time mood they hoped for a future kingdom as described in the revelations of the apostle John. They believed that Christ would rise again and establish a kingdom of peace for a thousand years. (from the Greek: χιλία- chilia "thousand", further information can also be found under "Millennialism" or “Premillennialism”). They were convinced that the millennial empire would begin in 1836. The Chiliasts wanted to experience this event in Jerusalem. However, it was not possible to leave there and so all hopes were pinned on the Caucasus. One of the protagonists of this movement was Baroness Juliane von Kruedener, who was also considered a prophetess. It influenced the Chiliasts to choose Mount Ararat, the alleged site where Noah's Ark can be found, as a new departure destination. This concept was also favoured by the Russian government's colonisation plans. King Wilhelm I. of Württemberg, the son of Friedrich I., cancelled the travel ban and in 1817 the wave of emigration to the east began.