© Heinz Schoon 2017
Economic Reasons for Emigration
The economic reasons for emigration at the beginning of the 19th century were: The real division of assets In Württemberg, the real division of hereditary property was practised. This means that each of the children received a share of the assets. The families were all very rich in children. This has fragmented the land and the private capital. Less and less had to suffice for the families - and less and less was enough to live on. The Swabians say,"Too little to live with and too much to die with." Harvest failure due to natural disasters The situation was exacerbated by poor harvests. In 1815 the volcano Tambora erupted on the small Indonesian island of Sumbawa. It threw gas and dust into the atmosphere. The ash cloud was moving around the earth. As a result, harvests failed for several years. The ashes darkened the sun and even in August it snowed. Exploitation by the ruler Duke Friedrich II. of Württemberg bought the royal dignity (King Friedrich I.) of Napoleon. He was a very despotic ruler. His high standard of living had to be financed. The magnificent castles, the feasts and the expensive mistresses devoured enormous sums. He squeezed the necessary capital out of the population. King Friedrich I. provided many thousands of soldiers, as well as horses and millions of gold ducats for Napoleon's army. After Napoleon's defeat, King Friedrich I. expressed his solidarity with the Allies and provided soldiers, horses and gold. Young peasant boys were pressed into the army in church on Sundays. Travelling soldiers had to be fed by the rural population, or on their retreat they captured everything they could find. Many citizens hoped for a better future for themselves and their families in the distance as a result of this situation. However, a travel ban by King Friedrich I. prevented these hopes for the time being.
© Heinz Schoon 2017
Economic Reasons for Emigration
The economic reasons for emigration at the beginning of the 19th century were: The real division of assets In Wuerttemberg, the real division of hereditary property was practised. This means that each of the children received a share of the assets. The families were all very rich in children. This has fragmented the land and the private capital. Less and less had to suffice for the families - and less and less was enough to live on. The Swabians say,"Too little to live with and too much to die with." Harvest failure due to natural disasters The situation was exacerbated by poor harvests. In 1815 the volcano Tambora erupted on the small Indonesian island of Sumbawa. It threw gas and dust into the atmosphere. The ash cloud was moving around the earth. As a result, harvests failed for several years. The ashes darkened the sun and even in August it snowed. Exploitation by the ruler Duke Friedrich II. of Württemberg bought the royal dignity (King Friedrich I.) of Napoleon. He was a very despotic ruler. His high standard of living had to be financed. The magnificent castles, the feasts and the expensive mistresses devoured enormous sums. He squeezed the necessary capital out of the population. King Friedrich I. provided many thousands of soldiers, as well as horses and millions of gold ducats for Napoleon's army. After Napoleon's defeat, King Friedrich I. expressed his solidarity with the Allies and provided soldiers, horses and gold. Young peasant boys were pressed into the army in church on Sundays. Travelling soldiers had to be fed by the rural population, or on their retreat they captured everything they could find. Many citizens hoped for a better future for themselves and their families in the distance as a result of this situation. However, a travel ban by King Friedrich I. prevented these hopes for the time being.